Campground Weddings: To Do or Not To Do is The Question


Some RV resorts even have wedding planners.

Across the country, growing numbers of Americans are realizing many campgrounds offer ideal settings for weddings and wedding receptions, according to campground operators and industry officials.

Not only are campgrounds more affordable than hotels or other typical reception venues, but they are also usually far more willing to accommodate weddings, either by letting wedding parties cook their own food or by allowing them to work with outside restaurants and caterers. Some campgrounds even offer their banquet services and wedding planners.

The scenic settings that campgrounds provide also make them alluring and some park operators are finding they can increase their spring and fall shoulder season business by promoting the ability to host weddings and receptions.


And since growing numbers of campgrounds offer rental accommodations, people are finding they can celebrate their weddings over an entire weekend with both their RVing and non-RVing friends.

While many couples like the casual and affordable reception venues and accommodations campgrounds provide, growing numbers of couples also had wedding weekends in some of the nation’s most luxurious campgrounds.

Are Camp Weddings Really Cheaper?

Take the cases of these two weddings:

Wedding 1

Seth and Madison Capps had their wedding at Mill Creek Ranch Resort in Canton, Texas. Park employees helped plan the wedding and reception, using catering services from a Dallas-based chef, according to Madison’s father, Kevin Gattis, who said his daughter’s wedding was “very reasonably priced.”

Some guests arrived at Mill Creek Ranch Resort as early as Thursday night and stayed through the Saturday wedding and reception and didn’t head home until Sunday. While some guests came in their RVs, others stayed in Mill Creek Ranch Resort’s park models and enjoyed the scenic setting, which includes a creek that runs through the resort.

Wedding 2

When Franny Teran and Charlie Freund got married, they organized a weekend full of fun activities for their family and friends at El Capitan Canyon, an upscale campground just north of Santa Barbara, California.

About 150 guests arrived Friday night and spent the whole weekend at the park. Some came in their RVs. Others checked into El Capitan Canyon’s luxurious park model cabins and yurts, while a handful of guests pitched tents.

But while weddings are typically formal events, Franny and Charlie’s wedding weekend started off with a sing-along around a bonfire Friday night as their guests munched on tacos, sipped margaritas and broke the ice with one another.

On Saturday, the guests took part in arts and crafts activities, with some helping to make floral arrangements for the wedding while others painted a “chuppah” or canopy, which Franny and Charlie would stand under during their Sunday wedding ceremony. The chuppah is a tradition in Jewish weddings.

Saturday night’s activities included a Western hoedown with live music and a square dance caller with a barbecue dinner that included tri-tip, chicken, roasted corn and beans.

On Sunday, the late morning wedding ceremony was followed by a brunch reception and karaoke show in which dozens of Franny and Charlie’s guests belted out their favorite songs.


THEIR ADVICE TO THOSE PLANNING NOW

Make sure you don't forget a steamer or iron for the day of the wedding :) Also, just breathe during the day. 

Remember that it's about you as a couple and that nothing else matters. All the details will fall into place. And make sure you hire a wedding videographer. Some couples don't because the think the photos are enough but there's something about a videographer that captures something different, and you will cherish those "real life moments" just as much as pictures. 


It's worth it but remember to save it in your budget! Otherwise just use a small video camera or go pro and pass it around to the guests to capture the whole day. Also, for people who are on a budget. To put this whole wedding into perspective, with all of the supplies + catering + videographer, ours was just under $20K. 

You can easily do a magical wedding for under $20k; you just have to be crafty and strategic about how you use your budget.

If you both love the outdoors, a campground resort can be perfect for your special day. You may have grown up going camping where the wedding can take place, and that can provide so many fun memories a DIY/RV wedding would fit the RV Lifestyle and bring together family and friends.


The Venue Report provides an extensive list of Camping or Glamping wedding venues. Find that list Here: The Venue Report



We look forward to opening our doors to you, and encourage you to explore all the RV lifestyle has to offer: http://lamesarv.com

6 Quick Tips for RV Beginners


Whether you're a family of weekend campers or a retired couple looking to travel full-time, every RV beginner has to know a few important things before making the maiden voyage. Here are six quick tips to consider:

Tip 1: Decide Whether to Buy or Rent

This isn't always an easy decision, with pros and cons for both. However, when you consider a few key factors, the answer becomes clearer.

Buy: You plan to go RV camping often or full-time and you have storage for the times when you aren't traveling.
Rent: You plan to go on a single trip, or want to test the waters before making a purchase.

Tip 2: Get to Know Your RV


With little road experience, it's especially important that RV beginners take time to learn how the motorhome works, even if it's just a rental. If something breaks, you should be able to assess the problem, and potentially fix it. This saves time and money spent at a mechanic.

When you get to know your RV, you're less likely to make operational errors. For example, if you don't know how many amps your main breaker can handle, there's a good chance you'll blow it. This is a potentially expensive error that can be avoided by getting to know your rig.

Tip 3: Take a Practice Drive


Consider the roads you plan to drive on, and take a smaller trip on similar terrain. As an RV beginner you don't yet know what will move around in the living area or how hard it will be to switch lanes, ascend hills, and park.

Once you know the intricacies of driving an RV, you can make necessary adjustments. For example, if your drawers pop open, which they often do, you need to find a way to keep them shut.

Tip 4: Bring Tools and Spare Parts


Pack a well-stocked tool kit, and add in the things that your RV might need, like extra fuses, light bulbs, jumper cables, nuts, bolts and connectors. In addition, be sure to bring parts that are unique to your rig. Without these, you risk having to wait for the part to be ordered and shipped.

Tip 5: Don't Wing It


The urge to be spontaneous is tempting when your home is on wheels. There's a certain pleasure in going where you want, when you want. Still, we recommend you have a plan: It does help, however, to have a solid plan in place if it's your first time planning an RV trip.

When RVing, plan:

The budget: How much you can allocate for food, fun and overnight stays.
Your food supply: To buy and or out.
The route: The one you plan to take and alternate options.
Stops: The places you want to see along the way.
Campgrounds: Where along the route you plan to call it a night.

Tip 6: Create a Campground Setup Checklist

As an RV beginner, you might not have a campground routine yet. Therefore, having a checklist will ensure everything is set up as it should be. Your checklist should include:

Check the site for low hanging branches or obstacles on the ground.
Locate the electrical, water and sewage hookups.
Pull your RV in, close to the hookups, and level it with blocks or stabilizing jacks, if necessary.
Secure your rig by chocking the wheels.
Connect to the electrical hookup, and switch your appliances to pull from this source of power, instead of the battery or propane.
Attach your sewer hose to the drain hook-up—be sure to wear gloves for this process.
Put out your awning and set up the campsite.

RV beginners have a lot to look forward to: RVing is a great way to travel and explore the outdoors. However, knowing the basics is important to having a stress-free trip.




Experience the Envoy - Blending Form and Function

Built in Middlebury, Indiana, Envoy RV was born from the idea that campers deserve an affordable luxury motorhome that truly surpasses expectations. Designed to meet even the most discerning RV’ers needs and desires, Envoy RV motorhomes are engineered for “Comfort On The Go”. Envoy incorporates the industry’s largest panoramic windshield, custom-designed marine-inspired furniture, luxury residential features and a 2-year limited warranty! Enjoy the open road and experience the outdoors, indoors in an Envoy RV!


Use our Brand Search to find the Envoy RV model or unit you want, and click on that unit. Each Envoy RV for sale has a details page with pictures, stock number, and detailed vehicle information to aid you in your search. Start your search now for the Envoy motorhome that is right for you: http://bit.ly/Envoy-RV-at-La-Mesa-RV

Top Tips for RVing with Pets


It’s been estimated that up to 75% of RV owners go RVing with pets. And why not? Your RV is a home away from home—especially if you’re full-timing—and dogs love outdoor adventures as much as you do.

But before you take your pet RVing, make sure to prepare pets often ahead of time for a successful trip. Your pet has needs that you don’t have, and it’s important to be aware of them so that everyone stays safe and happy.

How to Go RVing with Your Pet

Acclimate your pet to the RV
Humans adapt to new places pretty easily, and RVs can quickly become “home” for us. But it’s different for your pet. Before you travel anywhere, slowly introduce him to the RV by letting him discover it on his own terms. He should freely go in and out so that he doesn’t feel trapped or forced, which could increase his anxiety.

Once your pet is familiar with the RV, get him used to driving by taking short trips around town. Start with a 10- or 20-minute trip and increase it as he gets accustomed to riding.

Plan ahead

RVing with pets takes special planning beforehand. You’ll need to bring pet necessities, so create a pet packing list of everything you can’t leave behind. Your list should include the basic bedding, like food and doggie bags, as well as medical history, prescriptions, and emergency supplies.
Do your research ahead of time. Find a pet-friendly campground before you hit the road—and call ahead to make sure their policies haven’t changed. Find out if the destinations and activities on your itinerary will accommodate pets, and check if the national park you’re visiting allows your type of pet.

Tip! “Pet-friendly” doesn’t mean that all pets are welcome. There might be size or breed restrictions, or a limit on the number of pets allowed.

Drive safely
If you’re towing an RV, never keep your pet in the trailer while it’s in motion. She should stay in the vehicle with you so you can make sure she’s safe. Also, use a seat belt harness, so she doesn’t get tossed or jostled if you have to make quick stops or swerve around hazards.
Don’t forget medical readiness
Research veterinarians ahead of time, so that if a medical emergency occurs, you know exactly where to go. Also make sure your pet’s vaccinations and flea & tick treatments are current. You don’t want uninvited guests in your RV!

Get lots of exercises
Your pets need their exercise—especially dogs! Always keep your dog on a leash, for their safety as well as the safety of other pets and people. You can give outdoor cats the exercise they need by placing them on a harness and leash. They won’t like it at first, but most cats eventually get used to it.

Keep a routine
A regular routine is a must for your pet! Routines help her feel safe and at home. Keep your pet on a set feeding schedule (which also keeps pottying predictable—fewer surprises on your carpet!), and go for walks at the same time each day.

Leaving pets alone
You won’t have your pet with you 24/7. There will be times when you’ll have to leave him behind in the RV. Whenever you leave your dog or cat unattended in your motorhome, follow these practices:
•           Crate your dog, or use a hard-sided pet carrier for your cat. Crates make your pet feel safe, and it keeps him from getting into trouble or destroying your furniture.
•           Make sure the AC is running, and there’s plenty of ventilation.
•           Keep your time away to short intervals, whenever possible.




Be neighborly
Be a good neighbor. Familiarize yourself with the campground rules, and follow them. Keeping a pet at the campground is a privilege, not a right. We recommend introducing yourself to your camping neighbors and letting them know that you’re RVing with pets—ask them to tell you if your pet is ever a nuisance to them so you can correct her behavior.
And of course, clean up after your pet!

Figure out the litter box
Finding a spot for the litter box can be a bit of a challenge because your RV is a tiny space. Here’s a helpful post with a few suggestions for dealing with litter boxes.

Escape-proof your RV
Cats and dogs are great at taking off when you’re not expecting it. Don’t count on your screens to keep cats indoors, either! You may need to barricade doorways and keep windows shut to avoid escapes.
And if your pet is successful at getting out, be prepared!
•           Keep a photo of your pet handy so you can post Lost-Pet signs
•           Microchip your pet
•           Update your dog and cat tags with your cell phone on them, since you won’t be anywhere near your permanent address.

What Type of RVer Are You?




What's your travel style when RVing?

When you go RVing, you begin to identify the varying the RVers around you. It’s hard not to. Everyone has their own RV lifestyle. They find what excites them about RVing and they start living their life around those principles. When you discover what type of RVer you are, you open up a world of possibilities about how and where to travel.

These are some of the primary types of RVers hitting the road. While they may not cover all RVers, they cover the majority of the types find at the RV park or campground. The biggest benefit to identifying the type of RVer you are, is the communities you join and the places it opens you up to visit along the way. There are destinations for every type of RVer out there that cater to what they’re looking to get out of life and RVing.

Young couples are one of the largest RVing demographics.

"The Couple"




Many couples use travel as a way to get to know one another and spend time together. This will help to build the foundation of their relationship, especially when they already love to travel and experience new things. This couple is young, active and invests in smaller travel trailers and pop-up campers. RVing appeals to younger demographics because it’s affordable and is an adaptable weekend activity for couples with busy schedules.



Families are the fastest growing segment of RVers on the road.





The Family

It is said that The family that stays together travels together. Families that invest in time on and off the road have a healthier and happier time not only as a unit, but when facing life solo. Families travel to campgrounds, National Parks and other destinations like Disney World where they can participate in activities together and apart. For children traveling, this gives them the chance to try something new and meet others their age. The family may often invest in mid to large travel trailers, fifth wheel RVs, and motorhomes.


Full-time RVers bring a variety of opportunities.




The Full-Timer

Full-timers are those who’ve left traditional living behind. They’ve sold their homes, packed up their families, turned to telecommuting and invested in a heavy-duty towable set-up or motorhome. They hit the road, going where they want, when they want and don’t have to report to a boss or head home for rest. The recreational vehicle they travel in is their home in the truest sense of the word. The full-time RVer invests in motorhomes, travel trailers, and fifth wheels.


The Retirees

Retirees generally hit the golden age and decide to do something about it. They invest in motorhomes and travel trailers, hitting the road to visit family, friends and relive memories. Since they’re retired, they have no boss to report to so it’s easy to hit the road and never look back. These folks are looking to relive the past and make new memories in retirement. They’re looking for destinations all across the country and often migrate south to avoid winter.


The solo adventurer is out to see it all and do it all. They explore




The Solo Adventurer

The solo adventurer is usually a young male in his early 20s, although this demographic is changing to include more women. The solo RVer is looking to hit the backcountry and the least visited campsites and parks across the nation. They’re interested in recreational activities and that’s what drives their need to RV. They’re often part-timers, looking for fun and excitement without waiting for friends or family to make the time to travel. They invest in teardrop trailers and campers.


What Type of RVer Are You?


Depending on where you fall on the RV lifestyle scale, you will find communities, campgrounds, and organizations to join that cater to your style. This will help you make new friends, try new things and visit destinations you never considered. If you’re looking to get involved in the RV community beyond just your travels, exploring communities, groups, and organizations that share your RVing interests is key to getting the most out of the lifestyle. Make sure to take the time to plan your next RV adventure. Whether you’re going solo, with family or friends, visit RV forums, check out destination guides, and embrace the type of RVer you are on the open road.

4 Reasons to Become a Full-Time RVer



Full-time RVing allows you to meet new people and travel to new destinations on your own schedule.

Traveling by RV can be quite addictive. You start out on a few weekend trips; this leads to a week long journey and before you know it you’re on the road for weeks at a time. There is one last step in being the ultimate RVer, going full-time. Let’s look at why you should say goodbye to a brick and mortar home, and check out the benefits of full-time RV travel.

What Are the Benefits of Full-Time RVing?

1. Goodbye to Your Mortgage


One of the top benefits you will gain with full-time RV travel is letting go of your traditional home and letting go of all the associated costs as well. No property taxes, mortgages, and upkeep costs, granted it does cost money for campgrounds and resorts but if you live efficiently, these costs can be much lower than traditional living.

Many RVers are easily able to find work if they need a source of income. This might include finding seasonal work at National Parks, maintenance, and activities at an RV resort or other secure income.
With the advent of wireless technology and capabilities, many RVers still choose to work full-time jobs by telecommuting.

2. Freedom On and Off the Road


The top non-financial reason that people choose the full-time RVing lifestyle is the freedom that it affords them. You’re not tied down to a physical address; you don’t need to make stringent itineraries, book flights or make sure there is someone to look after the dog. You can wake up one morning and decide you want to see the whale migration of the Pacific coastline or catch some giant snapper in the Gulf of Mexico. Nothing is holding you back.

Within a few minutes, you’ve unplugged your utility hookups, and you’re on your way to a whole new adventure. It allows you the freedom to choose your climate. If Florida is too hot and muggy for you during the summer you can head to the mountains of Colorado, when that starts to get cooler, you can just move to the desert of Arizona. The whole US is open to accommodate you.

3. Sense of Community Among RVers


Many full-time RVers choose an RV resort to call home base. RV resorts offer long-term leasing opportunities for people who have decided to take on RV travel full-time. These resorts are not simple pads and bathrooms, many resorts offer stylish amenities, such as clubhouses, pools, fitness centers, and organized community events.

These events and activities will allow you to meet many other like-minded people who have chosen to hit the road for good. You can easily find a great sense of community and fun, and you may even meet and make some new lifetime friends in these type of resorts. Communities like Escapees, KOA, Good Sam Club and more can bring you together with RVers across North America.

4. Quality of Life Improvements


Another great reason to choose full-time RVing is the quality of life that it affords. People who RV are more likely to be active, more likely to be outdoors and live a healthier lifestyle. All these factors are shown to contribute to happiness and quality of life. Not to mention that many people who RV together report that they develop stronger relationships and bonds due to the RV lifestyle.

Full-time RVing allows you to get away from it all to see the country the way you want and to do it on your timetable. You can come and go as you please. Which can bring you comfort, relaxation, and adventure all at once. Full-time RVing puts you into control over how you live your life and where you go to do it.

There are many other small benefits to going full-time, but these are some of the major ones. Browse some RV forums and talk to other full-timers to get a better idea of what life is like before you set off on your own. Full-time RVing isn't for everyone but when you realize what an RV can do for you, and your family, it's hard to turn your back on the opportunities and freedom it affords.

RVing full-time isn’t for everyone. 

If you’re not sure if it’s right for you, you should consider a month to six-week long RV adventure. Drive longer than you have before, visit places you never thought about trekking, and consider dry camping or boondocking to get a taste of all the different facets of RVing. From there, you can decide whether the full-time RV life is right for you.