A Tale of Two South Carolinas & Where the Beauty of its Hidden Gems Are Today

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A History of South Carolina, The Hidden Gem of the Thirteen Colonies



One of the thirteen original colonies, South Carolina has had a rich and varied history. When Spanish and French explorers arrived in the area in the 16th century, they found a land inhabited by many small tribes of Native Americans, the largest of which were the Cherokees and the Catawbas. The first European attempts at settlement failed, but in 1670 a permanent English settlement was established on the coast near present day Charleston. The colony, named Carolina after King Charles I, was divided in 1710 into South Carolina and North Carolina. Settlers from the British Isles, France, and other parts of Europe built plantations throughout the coastal low country, growing profitable crops of rice and indigo. The port city of Charleston became an important center of commerce and culture. The interior or upcountry, meanwhile, was being slowly settled by small farmers and traders, who pushed the dwindling tribes of Native Americans to the west.
South Carolina, officially separated from North Carolina in 1729, was the scene of extensive military action during the Revolution and again during the Civil War. The Civil War began in 1861 as South Carolina troops fired on federal Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, and the state was the first to secede from the Union.
With its valuable history and importance to the growth of the US, Here are some of South Carolina's crown jewels( AKA Hidden Gems): 


Hagood Mill Historic Site & Folklife Center
The largest(20ft) and oldest known surviving gristmill still producing grain products in the state largest(20ft) and oldest known surviving gristmill still producing grain products in the state
Traditional arts, folklife and living history demonstrations include milling, blacksmithing, cotton ginning, moonshining, spinning, weaving, bee-keeping, metalsmithing, quilting, woodcarving, flintknapping, chair caning, open hearth cooking and more.
Many of this region's best bluegrass, old time, and blues musicians have performed at the Mill as well as other entertainment at the monthly third Saturday events
Admission is FREE and it has parking for your Motorhome.


To find out more about them, go here: Hagood Mill Historic Site & Folklife Center

Boneyard Beach
There is a three mile stretch of beach where hundreds of oak, cedar, and pine trees are scattered about. They have been bleached by the sun and saltwater after being caught in the changing shoreline of the island. It has been described as a living Dali painting.  And there is a bit of the surreal when you walk into this forest that has been stranded in the surf.


To find out more about the tours, island quest or charters, go here: Bulls Island Ferry


Harbor Island
Famous for its graceful sand dunes covered with sea oats and coastal grasses, Harbor Island is a private 1400-acre barrier island located 15 miles outside the city of Beaufort.
Hidden between Beaufort and Fripp Island, this Low country isle is a quiet place, with 3 miles of secluded beach.
Nearby attractions offer plenty: Explore Gullah culture on St. Helena Island, try a shrimp burger at the Shrimp Shack, climb the lighthouse at Hunting Island State Park. Later, join the throngs at Johnson Creek Tavern, Harbor’s local dive.
To find out more places to stay, things to do and where to eat, click here: Harbor Island

Stumphouse Tunnel
Locate about 7 miles northwest of Walhalla on Hwy 28, the 1,617 foot long Stumphouse Tunnel is an oddity. Started in 1852 to connect Charleston to Knoxville and eventually on to Cincinnati, the Civil War—and lack of funds—brought construction to a halt.
In 1951, Clemson University bought the tunnel and used it to cure the South's first blue cheese. The tunnel's environment was later duplicated at Clemson, and the cheese making, that Clemson is now famous for, was moved there. The tunnel still belongs to Clemson University, but it is managed by
the city of Walhalla.
To discover more about the area, go here: Stumphouse Tunnel

Sweatman’s BBQ
Converted farmhouse, buffet style, traditional South Carolina Mustard BBQ sauce, specialty-pork hash over traditional South Carolina Mustard BBQ sauce, specialty-pork hash over rice traditional South Carolina Mustard BBQ sauce, specialty-pork hash over rice.
The bar-b-que was and bar-b-que was and continues to be cooked fresh every week.  Oak, hickory, and pecan trees are cut and split for the wood that is burned in the cooking process.  The whole hogs are cooked over hot coals for 12-14 hours.   While cooking, they are continuously basted with our secret mustard based sauce.  Once done, the hogs are ready to be cut and prepared for serving!fresh every week.  Oak, hickory, and pecan trees are cut and split for the wood that is burned in the cooking process.  The whole hogs are cooked over hot coals for 12-14 hours.   While cooking, they are continuously basted with our secret mustard based sauce.  Once done, the hogs are ready to be cut and prepared for serving!
Sweatman's Bar-B-Que has been featured in several magazines and books over the years, including Southern Living Magazine, Garden & Gun Magazine, USA Today and The Huffington Post.  '
To find out more about the history of Sweatman's, click here: Sweatmans BBQ

These Hidden Gems Brought to you by:
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If you have any questions or concerns, do not hesitate to contact us by phone, email, or online form here on our website. We are more than happy to answer any questions and will help you through each step of the transaction process.

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